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Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc
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TOPIC: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc

Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #42

  • eciguser
I found this site that helped me to understand resistance in cartomizers from single to dual coils. Thought I share it to some of the new members that may feel challenged in getting the right cartomizers or atomizer for their egos or moded batteries.Resistances
Undestanding resistances, LR and HV

“LR” stands for low-resistance (for use on 3.7V or less batteries). “HV” stands for high-voltage.
To understand this HV and LR, it helps to be familiar with Ohms Law.
Power (measured in watts) is the intensity of the vape. 6-8 watts is the “sweet spot” for most vapers.
Current (measured in amps) is what can burn out cartomizers. Roughly speaking: around 1.5 amps is fine; 2.0+ amps is risky.
But watts and amps are not properties of cartomizers or batteries. They are derived from cartomizer resistance (measured in ohms) and battery voltage (measured, of course, in volts).

The formulas:
Watts = Volts X Volts / Ohms
Amps = Volts / Ohms
So we need to balance battery voltage with cartomizer resistance to get an ideal vape intensity (6-8 watts or so) without burning out the cartomizer. If the voltage is too low and/or the cartomizer resistance is too high (relative to each other), the watts are low and you get a poor vape (little throat hit, vapor, and flavor). On the other hand, if the voltage is too high and/or the cartomizer resistance is too low, the amps are high and you can burn out the cartomizer.

Regarding Resistance and Voltage Numbers
In what follows, and throughout the vaping community, we refer to cartomizer resistance and battery voltage as a set number, e.g., 2.3 ohms and 3.7V. In fact, cartomizer resistance should be viewed as +/- 0.1 ohms, e.g., a “2.3” ohm cartomizer is more like 2.2-2.4 ohms
Actual battery voltage drops considerably from fresh off the charger to stopping. The “nominal” voltage is more of an average or midpoint. For example, a “3.7V” battery starts out at 4.2V fully charged and drops down to 3.2V before demanding to be recharged. With this, larger mah batteries are desired for not only the life of the charge but the life of the charge in the sweet spot.

Standard 510/eGo cartomizers
A standard 2.3 ohm 510 cartomizer on a 3.4V 510 thin battery generates a safe 1.5 amps … but only 5 watts of power: not bad, but not intense enough for many vapers.
That same cartomizer on a 3.7V battery like the eGo and Go-go yields 6 watts and 1.7 amps: nice vaping with little risk of cartomizer burnout. The go-go has been perfectly matched with it's proprietary cartomizer and it one of the reasons the Go-go is highly praised, but yet relatively unknown.

HV cartomizers
Most “HV” cartomizers are 4.5 ohms resistance and are intended for use on 6V mods (using two 3.0V batteries or a booster).
NOTE: We do NOT recommend EVER stacking batteries for ANY reason, the info here is just that, info.

This results in 8 watts of vaping (very nice) and 1.3 amps current (a conservative level).
Some HV cartomizers are 3.5 ohms, intended for use on 5V mods: 7 watts and 1.4 amps.
Others are 5.2 ohms, intended for 7.4V mods (again using two 3.7V batteries): 10.5 watts and 1.4 amps.
So a correct matching of these “HV” cartomizers with these 5.0, 6.0, and 7.4 voltage levels delivers a powerful yet safe vape.

LR cartomizers
LR cartomizers are intended to yield vape intensity (watts) on 3.4V or 3.7V similar to what the higher voltage mods deliver. But some of them generate damaging current.
The further you push the amps above 1.5, the greater the risk of burning out an cartomizer.
The typical resistance of LR cartomizers is 1.5 ohms. Vapers routinely use such 1.5 ohm LR cartomizers on 3.4V eGos (7.7 watts and 2.3 amps) all the time: excellent vape intensity … but the life span of this tye of usage is much shorter due to the intensity.

There is no physical danger in such high amps, nothing blows up. It’s just that 1.5 ohm cartomizers die faster than standard (or high) resistance cartomizers.
Another consequence of the high amps created by 1.5 ohm LR cartomizers is that they should only be used on batteries of at least 450 mAh. So no dinky 510's!!
Those various resistances on 5V, 6V, and 7.4V will generate the following watts (i.e., intensity of the vape) and amps (the current that damages cartomizers):

This simplified chart below is just a quick reference.


Battery/Voltage Single Coil Dual Coil
510, 901, 808 2.0 - 2.5 ohm NO!
eGo Batteries 2.0 - 2.5 ohms. 1.5-1.7 ohms
3.7v (Go-go, Larger eGo, Riva) 1.7 to 3.2 ohms 1.5-1.7 ohms
5v (Variable Voltage) 2.5 to 3.2 ohms 2 ohms
6v (Variable Voltage) 3.2 ohms and up 2.5 ohms
7v (Variable Voltage) 4.5 to 5 ohms 3 ohms

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #81

  • Mysterio
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eciguser wrote:
I found this site that helped me to understand resistance in cartomizers from single to dual coils. Thought I share it to some of the new members that may feel challenged in getting the right cartomizers or atomizer for their egos or moded batteries.Resistances
Undestanding resistances, LR and HV

“LR” stands for low-resistance (for use on 3.7V or less batteries). “HV” stands for high-voltage.
To understand this HV and LR, it helps to be familiar with Ohms Law.
Power (measured in watts) is the intensity of the vape. 6-8 watts is the “sweet spot” for most vapers.
Current (measured in amps) is what can burn out cartomizers. Roughly speaking: around 1.5 amps is fine; 2.0+ amps is risky.
But watts and amps are not properties of cartomizers or batteries. They are derived from cartomizer resistance (measured in ohms) and battery voltage (measured, of course, in volts).

The formulas:
Watts = Volts X Volts / Ohms
Amps = Volts / Ohms
So we need to balance battery voltage with cartomizer resistance to get an ideal vape intensity (6-8 watts or so) without burning out the cartomizer. If the voltage is too low and/or the cartomizer resistance is too high (relative to each other), the watts are low and you get a poor vape (little throat hit, vapor, and flavor). On the other hand, if the voltage is too high and/or the cartomizer resistance is too low, the amps are high and you can burn out the cartomizer.

Regarding Resistance and Voltage Numbers
In what follows, and throughout the vaping community, we refer to cartomizer resistance and battery voltage as a set number, e.g., 2.3 ohms and 3.7V. In fact, cartomizer resistance should be viewed as +/- 0.1 ohms, e.g., a “2.3” ohm cartomizer is more like 2.2-2.4 ohms
Actual battery voltage drops considerably from fresh off the charger to stopping. The “nominal” voltage is more of an average or midpoint. For example, a “3.7V” battery starts out at 4.2V fully charged and drops down to 3.2V before demanding to be recharged. With this, larger mah batteries are desired for not only the life of the charge but the life of the charge in the sweet spot.

Standard 510/eGo cartomizers
A standard 2.3 ohm 510 cartomizer on a 3.4V 510 thin battery generates a safe 1.5 amps … but only 5 watts of power: not bad, but not intense enough for many vapers.
That same cartomizer on a 3.7V battery like the eGo and Go-go yields 6 watts and 1.7 amps: nice vaping with little risk of cartomizer burnout. The go-go has been perfectly matched with it's proprietary cartomizer and it one of the reasons the Go-go is highly praised, but yet relatively unknown.

HV cartomizers
Most “HV” cartomizers are 4.5 ohms resistance and are intended for use on 6V mods (using two 3.0V batteries or a booster).
NOTE: We do NOT recommend EVER stacking batteries for ANY reason, the info here is just that, info.

This results in 8 watts of vaping (very nice) and 1.3 amps current (a conservative level).
Some HV cartomizers are 3.5 ohms, intended for use on 5V mods: 7 watts and 1.4 amps.
Others are 5.2 ohms, intended for 7.4V mods (again using two 3.7V batteries): 10.5 watts and 1.4 amps.
So a correct matching of these “HV” cartomizers with these 5.0, 6.0, and 7.4 voltage levels delivers a powerful yet safe vape.

LR cartomizers
LR cartomizers are intended to yield vape intensity (watts) on 3.4V or 3.7V similar to what the higher voltage mods deliver. But some of them generate damaging current.
The further you push the amps above 1.5, the greater the risk of burning out an cartomizer.
The typical resistance of LR cartomizers is 1.5 ohms. Vapers routinely use such 1.5 ohm LR cartomizers on 3.4V eGos (7.7 watts and 2.3 amps) all the time: excellent vape intensity … but the life span of this tye of usage is much shorter due to the intensity.

There is no physical danger in such high amps, nothing blows up. It’s just that 1.5 ohm cartomizers die faster than standard (or high) resistance cartomizers.
Another consequence of the high amps created by 1.5 ohm LR cartomizers is that they should only be used on batteries of at least 450 mAh. So no dinky 510's!!
Those various resistances on 5V, 6V, and 7.4V will generate the following watts (i.e., intensity of the vape) and amps (the current that damages cartomizers):

This simplified chart below is just a quick reference.


Battery/Voltage Single Coil Dual Coil
510, 901, 808 2.0 - 2.5 ohm NO!
eGo Batteries 2.0 - 2.5 ohms. 1.5-1.7 ohms
3.7v (Go-go, Larger eGo, Riva) 1.7 to 3.2 ohms 1.5-1.7 ohms
5v (Variable Voltage) 2.5 to 3.2 ohms 2 ohms
6v (Variable Voltage) 3.2 ohms and up 2.5 ohms
7v (Variable Voltage) 4.5 to 5 ohms 3 ohms



Thank you eciguser. Very detailed synopsis.
I am impressed

-Mysterio

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #215

  • Evelyn
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This is helpful, thank you!

One thing i want to say is that tolerance on resistance for attys and cartos varies a lot. If you don't have a PV that tells you your resistance, the only way to know for sure is to use a multimeter to check. To be honest, I trust the rating they come with unless something is off, or I am doing a juice review, where vape wattage may matter.

Yes, I can be a bit of a tech-head.

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #216

  • Fat Daddy
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This Chart may help someone out with this.

The following user(s) said I Really Like This: Evelyn, Peeps, One_Pink_Sneaker, arkangel

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #327

  • Blakd
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Thank you for this chart Daddy

Good info and find, good thing to have here.
Last Edit: 2 years, 6 months ago by Blakd.

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 6 months ago #329

  • Fat Daddy
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Blakd wrote:
Thank you for this chart Daddy

Good info and find, good thing to have here.


Thank you. I know this chart has made its rounds. However I know not everyone has seen it.

Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 5 months ago #1024

  • yankeebobo
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Good info. I personally will push a 1.5ohm boge to my sweet spot of 4.3ish with no problems. Yes it needs to be watched for sufficient juice. Yes in some cases battery draw is higher but it's been successful. Now. Would I push it too much higher? No. With a future goal of a provari on mind, I'd likely settle on 2.0ohm SRs.

All this I find dependent I. The juice too. In some cases no matter what the match is, the VTF is actually best at 3.7-4.0V anyway.

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 4 months ago #1819

  • Mr Fixit
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The only thing left out is the function / effect of resistance VS the coil surface area.

Follow me here - The resistance wire used is measured out based on the final resistance desired for the Atty or Carto.
An LR carto has a lower resistance because the wire is shorter, the side effect is less surface area to produce Vapor!

This is the reason seasoned vapers go for the HV mods, higher resistance = more surface area in contact with the juice to generate vapor.

The Next Gen: now multiple coils - 2 and 3 coil cartos can be had, if you had 2, 3 ohm coils and connected them side to side (in Parallel) you would have a 1.5 ohm coil with much more surface to convert juice to vapor.

Same wattage for the applied voltage with roughly 4 times the surface area of a single 1.5 ohm coil.

Now you know the Rest of the Story!

Intense technical rant available upon request.
Last Edit: 2 years, 4 months ago by Mr Fixit. Reason: Spelling/spacing
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Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 4 months ago #1840

  • Wood Artist
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Mr Fixit wrote:
The only thing left out is the function / effect of resistance VS the coil surface area.

Follow me here - The resistance wire used is measured out based on the final resistance desired for the Atty or Carto.
An LR carto has a lower resistance because the wire is shorter, the side effect is less surface area to produce Vapor!

This is the reason seasoned vapers go for the HV mods, higher resistance = more surface area in contact with the juice to generate vapor.

The Next Gen: now multiple coils - 2 and 3 coil cartos can be had, if you had 2, 3 ohm coils and connected them side to side (in Parallel) you would have a 1.5 ohm coil with much more surface to convert juice to vapor.

Same wattage for the applied voltage with roughly 4 times the surface area of a single 1.5 ohm coil.

Now you know the Rest of the Story!

Intense technical rant available upon request.








There are other ways around this also... I like to use genesis rebuildable tank attys.Many times I'll use a mechanical 3.7v mod and use 30gauge resistance wire vs the standard 32 gauge most use. The thicker wire has less resistance therefor giving you more wraps (surface area of the coil on a LR set up
ßrąd Grüss ~ owner
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ωood ♏odک ●∁☯♏
Last Edit: 2 years, 4 months ago by Wood Artist.

Re: Understanding Resistance ohm 1.5, 2.0 etc 2 years, 4 months ago #1849

  • trlrtrash13
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Mr Fixit wrote:
The only thing left out is the function / effect of resistance VS the coil surface area.

Follow me here - The resistance wire used is measured out based on the final resistance desired for the Atty or Carto.
An LR carto has a lower resistance because the wire is shorter, the side effect is less surface area to produce Vapor!

This is the reason seasoned vapers go for the HV mods, higher resistance = more surface area in contact with the juice to generate vapor.

The Next Gen: now multiple coils - 2 and 3 coil cartos can be had, if you had 2, 3 ohm coils and connected them side to side (in Parallel) you would have a 1.5 ohm coil with much more surface to convert juice to vapor.

Same wattage for the applied voltage with roughly 4 times the surface area of a single 1.5 ohm coil.

Now you know the Rest of the Story!

Intense technical rant available upon request.


Good take on this. I see HV mod users posting about using LR cartos. Is there a practical reason for this? Does it accomplish something that I haven't take into consideration?


You know what date is on this coin? 1958. It's been traveling 22 years to get here. And now it's here. And it's either heads or tails, and you have to say. Call it.
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